Lucian Camp of Lucian Camp Consulting shares one of his all-time favourite examples of ultra persuasive copy.

    Everyone agrees that when it comes to writing persuasive marketing communications, the single most important thing is the ability to put yourself in your reader’s shoes – to say what you have to say in terms that are relevant and meaningful to them, not to you. But what does this really means in practice?

    My all-time favourite example is a letter that I received from a small IFA firm specialising in employee benefits for small companies. Back in the days when I was creative director of an advertising agency I used to receive quite a few of these, and they all found their way straight into the bin – all except one.  Here, from memory, is what it said.

    Dear Mr Camp

    Have you ever wondered what other creative directors earn?

    I am a financial adviser who specialises in the advertising and media sector, so a lot of my clients are creative directors like you. I’ve taken the opportunity to do a research survey among them recently, to find out what kind of salary and benefits they’re currently getting.

    I know that at this time of year, it’s very likely that you’re reviewing your own salary and benefits with your employers, so I think you might find it particularly useful to know the facts revealed in my survey. If you’d like me to pop round and show it to you, please call XXXX.

    Yours sincerely

    XXXX

    Quite frankly I think everyone wants to know how their remuneration stacks up against their peer group, whether it’s annual review time or not. I had to see the survey findings, and I was on the phone within two minutes to book the bloke in.

    And if you’re at all doubtful about whether this approach was quite as relevant and well targeted as I say it is, think about this statistic. When I met the man behind the initiative, I asked him how many appointments it had generated. “I sent out 50 letters,” he told me. “And you’re my 43rd meeting.”

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